Human Formation

 

The Holy Father tells us in Pastores Dabo Vobis that human formation is the basis of all priestly formation. He tells us that in order for a priest's ministry to be credible and acceptable amongst those he shepherds, "it is important that the priest mold his human personality in such a way that it becomes a bridge and not an obstacle for others in their meeting with Jesus Christ the Redeemer of humanity " ( Pastores Dabo Vobis 43). To that end, human formation takes place primarily within a communal context. As a member of the seminary community, each man commits himself to the other members of the house where they foster a rhythm of community life that provides a balance between private prayer and liturgy, theological study and pastoral interaction, recreation and rest.Seminarians at the March For Life 2009

 

To facilitate their common life, seminarians from different years and dioceses live on a corridor with a priest faculty member. This arrangement familiarizes each seminarian with a smaller group of seminarians within the larger community. These "corridor communities" reflect the rhythm of priestly fraternity. All seminarians are expected to attend and participate in all house and community activities.

 

Additionally, seminarians are responsible for a "house job." The assigned chores offer the candidates opportunities to model service for one another, and also to enhance commitment to the maintenance of our facilities and the well ordering of our common life. Seminarians are expected to spend three hours per week on their house job.

 

Seminarians are also trained in the area of multicultural diversity. Spanish, Polish, Haitian, and Vietnamese cultures are currently represented in the Seminary community. This diversity is a source of richness for community life, and a great benefit for "multicultural formation" as students interact with one another and with faculty in a variety of settings. Mass is celebrated in Spanish once a month, and multilingual songs are often incorporated in the Eucharist and other liturgical functions.

 

The human formation of each seminarian is monitored and evaluated by the Rector, the Dean of Seminarians, and the Faculty Advisors. The formation team maintains a special responsibility in measuring each seminarian's growth in this regard.